The NDIS is a government scheme and there are certain factors and information you need to provide to determine your eligiblity. You need to be able to provide information about your disability, including what your disability is, whether it is permanent and how it impacts the way you function in your life. If the evidence of disability you provide is unclear, the NDIA can ask for more information, delay your request, or refuse your request.

What types of disabilities are supported by the NDIS?

At CareAbout, we like to think of people as being differently abled. What is right for one person may not be right for another person.

We understand disability impacts people in a range of ways. There are many different disabilities, and no two people with the same disability will have the same experience.

Because the National Disability Insurance Scheme is a government system, there are a range of factors that determine whether a person is eligible for direct support. And there are a range of different disabilities that

The National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) is responsible for determining who is eligible to access the NDIS. The NDIA requires you to meet disability or early intervention requirements.

You need to be able to provide information about your disability, including what your disability is, whether it is permanent (how long is it expected to last), and how it impacts the way you function in your life. Also, depending on your age, for example children under 7 years old, may need to provide evidence to meet the early intervention access requirements.

If the evidence of disability you provide is unclear, the NDIA can ask for more information, delay your request, or refuse your request.

What evidence do I need to be eligible?

We recommend you provide as clear information as possible about your disability and how it impacts on your daily functioning. Ideally, the evidence you provide should:

  • confirms your primary disability type and the date it was diagnosed (if available)
  • confirms the impacts of your disability on all aspects of your life (for example,   mobility/motor skills, communication, social interaction, learning, self-care and self-management).
  • describes how long the disability will last, and what treatment options (including previous treatments and outcomes and if possible future treatment options and expected outcomes of those treatments)
  • be relatively recent (ie in the past 6-12 months)
  • be completed by a professional relevant to your primary disability.

Examples of common treating health professionals include:

  • General Practitioner (GP)
  • Paediatrician
  • Orthopaedic surgeon
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Speech Pathologist (Therapist)
  • Neurologist
  • Psychologist or Psychiatrist

Ideally, the professional providing evidence should be the most appropriate person to provide evidence of your primary disability and have been seeing you for some time (for example, 6 months or more).

These professionals should know which assessments or reports they need to provide. The NDIA provides a list of relevant assessments that professionals can use (and which you may need to get). The list is available here.

NDIA lists of eligible conditions

The NDIA maintains lists which its staff use to determine who will get entry to the scheme. These lists are updated from time to time.

At CareAbout, we are committed to keeping you fully informed about important information like this so you can be in the best possible position to receive and maximise your support.

National Disability Insurance Agency lists of conditions:

  1. List a – conditions which are likely to meet the disability requirements in section 24 of the NDIS act
  2. List b – permanent conditions for which functional capacity are variable and further assessment of functional capacity generally is required
  3. List c – defined programs
  4. List d – permanent impairment/early intervention, under 7 years – no further assessment required

Main types of disability

The NDIA reports regularly on the range of disabilities which are supported under the NDIS. The main types of disability by group are as follows:

Intellectual Disability – approximately 30% of all participants as at end December 2017

  • Assessed as having less than 70 IQ.
  • includes Down Syndrome which is most common cause of intellectual disability.
  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017 – $75,000

Developmental Delay (and Global DD) – 8%

  • Note around half of children with developmental delay ‘grow out’ of their disability.
  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017 – $12,000 Dev Delay, and $17,000 for Global Dev Delay

Autism – 25%

  • Difficulties with social communication, restricted or repetitive behaviours, other developmental, emotional or behavioural problems, anxiety, intellectual disability, ADHD.
  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017 – $33,000

Psychosocial disability 10%

  • Disability arising from mental health issue. Must prove it is permanent condition (may fluctuate).  Main examples are: schizophrenia, anxiety disorders (OCD, PTSD, agoraphobia,  mood disorders bipolar and major depression.
  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017 – $58,000

Other neurological 5%

  • Average Package Size – $95,000

Cerebral Palsy 4%

  • Brain damage from brain injury or abnormal development while a child’s brain is still developing before birth, during birth, or immediately after birth. Affects body movement, muscle control, muscle coordination, muscle tone, reflex, posture and balance.
  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017 – $95,000

Acquired Brain Injury 3%

  • Any type of brain damage that happens after birth. Causes of ABI include disease, blows to the head, alcohol and drug use, or oxygen deprivation.
  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017 – $95,000

Hearing impairment 2%

  • Loss of hearing from birth or acquired. Partial or total.
  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017 – $18,000

Visual (sic) impairment 2%

  • Loss of sight from birth or acquired. Partial or total.
  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017 – $31,000

Other sensory/speech 1%

  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017- $12,000

Multiple Sclerosis 3%

  • Immune response that can affect brain, spinal cord, and the optic nerves in eyes. It can cause problems with vision, balance, muscle control, and other basic body functions.
  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017 – $86,000

Other Physical 3%

  • includes amputees, congenital loss of limbs, short stature, muscular atrophy, osteogenesis, skin/epidermic.
  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017- $65,000

Stroke 1%

  • Blood supply to the brain is stopped. Results in a restriction in physical activities or work; incomplete use of feet/legs and/or arms/fingers; difficulty gripping/holding things; speech.
  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017- $97,000

Spinal Cord Injury 1%

  • Damage to spinal cord resulting in loss of movement, control
  • Average Package Size as at end December 2017- $112,000

Want to know more?

If you need more information, contact CareAbout on 1300 036 028 and speak to one of our care advisors.